Working From Home: Working Hard Or Hardly Working

Working from home can be challenging, but also very rewarding. In this article, I have listed 15 tips for working efficiently from home.

The current situation in the world has become so unpredictable. Most of you are forced (or prefer) to work from home. This can be challenging on its own, but coupled with your spouse also working from home, and your kids staying home all the time, it can become quite an adventure.

In this article, I have shared a few tips that I am using to tackle the same situation for my family and I. I am a person who loves their personal space, enjoys doing deep, concentrated work. My spouse is the same. At the same time, we have a 4-year-old at home always eager for our attention.

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Do What You Love or Love What You Do

Doing what you love is bad advice. Working hard, improving the skills that stand out, taking small steps forward, is what gets you to love what you do.

Should you try to do what you love (a.k.a. your passion) for a living? You get bombarded with this question over and over again in your everyday life. It is on the social media (e.g. people posting about doing what they love and getting paid for it). It is also on the TV (e.g. famous celebrities evangelizing their lifestyles and how they satisfy even their weirdest pleasures). And of course, it is also in the movies and songs (e.g. those influencers that changed the world by pursuing their dreams). In short, doing what you love is about following your passion.

In this article, I will argue against following your passion. And I will argue for another approach – adopting a different mindset, deliberately working on your habits, defining the areas where you are great, and, ultimately, learning to love what you do. In short, defining the passion as the product of your work, rather than defining work as the product of your passion.

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Gil’s List of Best Books 2019 (Non-business)

A list of the best books I’ve read in 2019 that are “non-business”. Covering a collection of spirituality, wisdom, philosophy, and psychology topics.

Once again, I would like to share my list of best books in 2019. You can find my list for 2018: here.

I concentrated on non-business books. Tin’s list of best books of 2019 can be found here.

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Tin’s List of Best Books 2019

A list of the best books I’ve read in 2019 that are relevant to the topics in my blog – personal and professional growth, optimization and productivity.

2019 is almost over and it is time for my annual list of the best books that I’ve read this year. I spent relatively more time writing than reading (stay tuned for more info in 2020), but I still managed to hit my official goal of 22 and my stretch goal of 30. I also managed to hit a fun milestone that I set for myself – 10.000 pages in total (10.107 pages, which is about 1.000 less than my all-time record). The change this year is that I started commuting with a car to work which reduced my opportunity to read in transit, but I started arriving earlier and I could use the first hour of the work day for reading and writing.

Previous articles: Best books 2018, Best Books 2017.

In this article, I listed the five books that I would recommend out of my year’s selection (and one bonus). If you are interested, this is a link to my Goodreads account (link) where I diligently summarize my reading experience.

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Organizing the Perfect Workshop

Leading a workshop is an intimidating but a very rewarding task. This article will teach give you twelve tips and tricks to create the perfect environment.

A workshop is one of the most efficient ways to learn new skills, polish or improve an existing skill, or bring back to memory a forgotten skill. Unlike a seminar or a lecture, where the emphasis is usually on pushing information to the audience, a workshop relies primarily on the audience actively practicing a skill. Research shows that learning new skills is facilitated by actual practice. Have you ever heard of somebody trying to learn to swim without getting into the water?

Most probably, a good deal of you have already been to a workshop (or at least a seminar, or a lecture). Have you ever wondered if the presenter (trainer, instructor) has ever read all the slides to the end? Have you ever secretly smiled when the presenter is surprised by the existence of a specific slide. “Wow! When did they add this?” Who’s “they”?

If you ever find yourself owning and organizing a workshop, this article will help you create the best possible environment so that your students can benefit from the experience. “The best possible environment” usually means smooth, distraction-free. As well as prompting the students (or listeners, or attendees) to actually work on the skills that you are presenting to them. The end goal is two fold. As a presenter you need to walk out the room with a good feeling that “most of the things went well”. And the students need to walk out the room with a set of new tools so that they continue practicing the new skill.

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